2017 NFL Free Agency Analytics Profile: Jordan Cameron

2017 Free Agency Profiles  

Jordan Cameron

Tight End

Team Miami Dolphins
Age (On Draft Day) 22.73
Height 6-5
Weight 254
Arm Length 35
Hand Size 11.125
Age Percentile 66.14
MSA Percentile 60.23
Market Share Percentile 21.65
Explosive Lower Body Strength Score 89.34
Speed Score 95.81
Flexibility Score 99.14
Bench 23

 

Prospect CHECKLIST

 Yes All-Pro Age Percentile 52 or Higher 100% of Multiple All-Pro TEs since the 1963 NFL Draft Class were in the 51 Percentile or Higher ranked from youngest to oldest
 No All-Pro and Pro Bowl Market Share MSA Percentile: 70 or Higher 90% of Multiple All-Pro and Pro Bowl TEs since the 1963 NFL Draft Class were in the 70 Percentile MSA or Higher
 Yes Long-term Starter Market Share MSA Percentile: 50 or Higher 91% of 64 Start or More TEs since the 1963 NFL Draft Class were in the 50 Percentile MSA or Higher
 No All-Pro Production Percentile: 80 or Higher 93% of Multiple All-Pro TEs since the 1963 NFL Draft Class were in the 80 percentile or higher in market share production
 No  Pro Bowl Production Percentile: 58 or Higher 92% of Multiple Pro Bowl TEs since the 1963 NFL Draft Class were in the 58 Percentile or Higher of market share production
 Yes Starter Production Percentile: 7.68 or Higher 99% of 64 Start or Higher TEs since the 1963 NFL Draft Class were in the 58 Percentile or Higher of market share production
 Yes All-Pro Height 6-5 or Taller 100% of Multiple All-Pro TEs since the 1999 NFL Draft Class were 6-5 or Taller
 Yes Pro Bowl Height 6-3 or Taller 100% of Multiple Pro Bowl TEs since the 1999 NFL Draft Class were 6-3 or Taller
 Yes All-Pro Arm Length: 33 ½ Inches 100% of Multiple All-Pro TEs since the 1999 NFL Draft Class had 33 ½ Inch Arms or >
 Yes Long-Term Starter Arm Length: 30 7/8 Inches 100% of 64 Start or more TEs since the 1999 NFL Draft Class had 30 7/8 Inch Arms or >
 Yes All-Pro and Pro Bowl Hand Size: 10 ½ Inches 100% of Multiple All-Pro and Pro Bowl TEs since the 1999 NFL Draft Class had 10 ½ Inch Hand Size or >
 Yes Long-term Starter Hand Size: 9 Inches 100% of 64 Start or more TEs since the 1999 NFL Draft Class had 9 Inch Hand Size or >
 Yes Explosive Lower Body Strength Score: 35.5 or higher 100% of multiple All-Pro and Pro Bowl TEs since 1998 had at least an explosive lower body strength score of 35.5
 Yes Speed Score: 78.89 or higher 100% of multiple All-Pro and Pro Bowl TEs since 1998 had at least a speed score of 78.89 or higher
 Yes Flexibility Score: 57.82 or higher 100% of multiple All-Pro and Pro Bowl TEs since 1998 had a flexibility score of 57.82 or higher
 Yes Athleticism Score: 78.89 or higher 100% of multiple All-Pro and Pro Bowl TEs since 1998 had at least one athleticism score of 78.89 or higher
 Yes Bench: 23 or higher 100% of multiple All-Pro and Pro Bowl TEs since 1998 had at least 23 reps on the bench

*MSA Rating: The average score of a prospect’s market share production, strength of schedule and age percentile scores

*Explosive Lower Body Strength Score: A score formulated from a prospect’s vertical, broad jump and mass density measured against all his positional peers since 1998.

*Speed Score: A score formulated from a prospect’s 40-yard dash and mass density measured against all his positional peers since 1998.

*Flexibility Score: A score formulated from a prospect’s short shuttle, 3-Cone and mass density measured against all his positional peers since 1998.

NFL Market Share Production

jordan-cameron

Metric Recommendation: Jordan Cameron is the antithesis to the “basketball” theory as it relates to tight end prospects. The theory that you can take an super athletic and physical mismatch with little production or experience at the position. And turn them into a multiple All-Pro or Pro Bowl player like Jimmy Graham or Antonio  Gates. However, based on the decades’ worth of production data I’ve gathered and examined, this “basketball” theory is a fairly new phenomena. And while yes, you can get a starter out of a physical and athletic mismatch. But to find players who present you with consistent elite value each season still favors those who were productive in college.

How this relates to Jordan Cameron is here we have another very impressive athlete with tremendous size, length and hand size measures. But was not productive in college, and despite a very splashy 2013 season. He’s been more average than above average in his career contrary to the “basketball” theory. I see Cameron as a starting caliber tight end who could have another season where he finishes in the top 5 of tight ends again if he’s healthy. But I’d pay for the valleys rather than the peaks when it comes to Cameron in the future.

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